Box Truck - Road Vehicles

class="left_top_holder">

Road Vehicles

They usually range in size 4 to 7 m in length, with smaller or larger sizes existing but being rare in North America. They usually have a garage door-like rear door that rolls up. On some box trucks, the cargo area is accessible from the cab through a small door.

Box trucks are usually used by companies that need to haul appliances or furniture. They are also used as moving trucks which can be rented from companies such as U-Haul or Ryder.

In North America, Ford, Dodge and Chevrolet/GMC have historically been the most common manufacturers of conventional cab/chassis to which various producers (called body builders or upfitters) attach the box that holds cargo. Isuzu, Mitsubishi Fuso and UD/Nissan Diesel have been the most common marketers of cab over-type medium duty cab/chassis used as platforms for box trucks. In North America, these trucks can range from Class 3 to Class 7 (12,500 lb. to 33,000 lb. gross vehicle weight rating, or GVWR). As of July 31, 2009, however, GM closed the plant that manufactured its medium duty commercial trucks, and announced it was withdrawing from the medium-duty commercial truck market. The same GM plant also manufactured Isuzu class 6 and class 7 models and Isuzu class 3 gasoline-engine cabover models. Isuzu's plans for acquisition or manufacture of the affected models have not been announced, as of January 2010.

The body on a box truck is sometimes called a cargo van or dry van body, though the term "cargo van" is more often used to designate a regular full size van, such as a Mercedes-Benz Sprinter or a Ford E-Series/Ford Transit, without rear seats and usually without side windows in the cargo area. However, small box trucks often use the cab of full size vans from the big three (i.e. Ford E-Series/Econoline, Dodge Ram Van, Chevrolet Express/Chevrolet Van/GMC Vandura/GMC Savana).

Read more about this topic:  Box Truck

Other articles related to "road vehicles, vehicles, vehicle, roads":

Structure of The ISO 11898 Standard
... setting up an interchange of digital information between electronic control units of road vehicles equipped with the CAN at transmission rates above 40 ... a time-triggered interchange of digital information between electronic control units (ECU) of road vehicles equipped with CAN, and specifies the frame synchronisation entity that coordinates the ... layer for transmission rates up to 1Mbit/s for use within road vehicles ...
List Of Statutory Instruments Of The United Kingdom, 1988 - 1101-1200
... Heavy Goods Vehicles (Drivers' Licences) (Amendment) (No. 1988/1101 Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) (No. 1988/1102 Motor Vehicles (Type Approval) (Amendment) Regulations 1988 S.I ...
Personal Track Safety
... hazards include collisions between a rail vehicle and a track worker, electrocution from traction power sources (third rail, fourth rail, OHLE) and trips and falls ... Compared to road vehicles, trains have a much greater stopping distance at the same speed, but often travel much faster than road vehicles ... Unlike road vehicles, they cannot swerve out of the way of obstructions ...
Ocala National Forest - Activities
... The Ocala National Forest offers many locations to ride Off Road Vehicles ... There are areas that are restricted to off road vehicles a detailed forest map can help provide information on areas open to off road vehicles ... Forest riding trails are actually old roads six to eight feet wide, marked at intervals with painted spots – called blazes – on the trees ...

Famous quotes containing the words vehicles and/or road:

    Only by the supernatural is a man strong; nothing is so weak as an egotist. Nothing is mightier than we, when we are vehicles of a truth before which the state and the individual are alike ephemeral.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Future contingents cannot be certain to us, because we know them as such. They can be certain only to God whose understanding is in eternity above time. Just as a man going along a road does not see those who come after him; but the man who sees the whole road from a height sees all those who are going along the road at the same time.
    Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274)