Bothwell Castle

Bothwell Castle is a large medieval castle sited on a high, steep bank, above a bend in the River Clyde, in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. It is located between Uddingston and Bothwell, about 10 miles (16 km) south-east of Glasgow. Construction of the castle was begun in the 13th century by the ancestors of Clan Murray, to guard a strategic crossing point of the Clyde. Bothwell played a key role in Scotland's Wars of Independence, changing hands several times.

The huge cylindrical Donjon was built in the 13th century, but before the rest of the castle was completed it was severely damaged in a series of sieges. Rebuilding in the early 15th century enlarged the castle, but it was abandoned by the 18th century. The present ruin is rectangular, with the remains of the Donjon to the west, and the later Great Hall to the east. The courtyard is enclosed by long curtain walls, with round towers at the south-east and south-west corners.

Read more about Bothwell Castle:  History

Other articles related to "bothwell castle, bothwell, castle":

Bothwell Castle
... The picturesque ruin of Bothwell Castle occupies a position on a bluff above a bend in the River Clyde on the edge of Bothwell, which here takes the bold sweep famed in Scottish song as the ... The lordship was bestowed in 1487 on Patrick Hepburn, 3rd Lord Hailes, 1st Earl of Bothwell ... The castle is a fine example of Gothic architecture ...
Bothwell Castle - History - Douglas
... In 1362, Joan Moray of Bothwell, heiress of the Morays, married Archibald Douglas, nicknamed "the Grim" and later to be Lord of Galloway and Earl of Douglas ... Douglas commenced rebuilding Bothwell, repairing the donjon and completing the walls ... James III granted Bothwell to Lord Crichton, and then to Sir John Ramsay, who were both forfeited in turn ...

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