Book of The Law of The Lord - Editions of 1851 and 1856

Editions of 1851 and 1856

The Book of the Law of the Lord was published in two separate editions during James Strang's lifetime. The first edition of 1851 contained only eighty pages and consisted of material translated directly from the Plates of Laban, with five exceptions: three revelations given to Strang, and two sections written "by inspiration of God."

In contrast, the edition of 1856 comprised 320 pages, including all of the text in the 1851 edition, plus ten new chapters and a series of notes added by Strang to explain the text. The 1856 edition is the one generally used by Strangites today. It was never bound with a title page or preface; subsequent reprints have used the title page, testimony and preface from the 1851 edition. In fact, the 1856 edition was not bound at all until after Strang's death, as he was assassinated before this was completed. Its uncut sheets had to be rescued from an anti-Mormon mob by Strang's disciples.

Both editions of the Book of the Law are dated according to the year of James Strang's reign: the 1851 edition is annotated "A. R. I," while the 1856 edition carries the date "A. R. VI."

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Book Of The Law Of The Lord - Editions of 1851 and 1856
... Book of the Law of the Lord was published in two separate editions during James Strang's lifetime ... The first edition of 1851 contained only eighty pages and consisted of material translated directly from the Plates of Laban, with five exceptions three revelations given to ... The 1856 edition is the one generally used by Strangites today ...

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