Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation, often simply known as Revelation or by a number of variants expanding upon its authorship or subject matter, is the final book of the New Testament and occupies a central part in Christian eschatology. Written in Koine Greek, its title is derived from the first word of the text, apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation". The author of the work identifies himself in the text as "John" and says that he was on Patmos, an island in the Aegean, when he "heard a great voice" instructing him to write the book. This John is traditionally supposed to be John the Apostle, although recent scholarship has suggested other possibilities including a putative figure given the name John of Patmos. Most modern scholars believe it was written around 95 AD, with some believing it dates from around 70 AD.

The book spans three literary genres: epistolary, apocalyptic, and prophetic. It begins with an epistolary address to the reader followed by an apocalyptic description of a complex series of events derived from prophetic visions which the author claims to have seen. These include the appearance of a number of figures and images which have become important in Christian eschatology, such as the Whore of Babylon and the Beast, and culminate in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. The obscure and extravagant imagery has led to a wide variety of interpretations: historicist interpretations see in Revelation a broad view of history; preterist interpretations treat Revelation as mostly referring to the events of the apostolic era (1st century), or--at the latest--the fall of the Roman Empire; futurists believe that Revelation describes future events; and idealist or symbolic interpretations consider that Revelation does not refer to actual people or events, but is an allegory of the spiritual path and the ongoing struggle between good and evil.

The Book of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament canon, though there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles.

Read more about Book Of Revelation:  Title, Authorship, Content, Outline, Interpretations, Old Testament Origins

Other articles related to "book of revelation, of revelation, book of, book":

Book Of Revelation - Old Testament Origins
... Much of Revelation employs ancient sources, primarily but not exclusively the Old Testament ... example, Howard-Brook and Gwyther regard the Book of Enoch (1 Enoch) as an equally significant but contextually different source ... from non-conforming backgrounds, who interspersed the text of Revelation with the prophecy they thought was being promised ...
Helter Skelter (Manson Scenario) - References To The Beatles and The Book of Revelation - Book of Revelation, As Interpreted By Manson
... feet as pillars of fire And he had in his hand a little book open and he set his right foot upon the sea, and his left foot on the earth.. ...
Christianity And Politics - Foundations - Anarchism - Book of Revelation
... such as Jacques Ellul, have identified the State and political power as the Beast in the Book of Revelation ... at least, is a frequently mentioned interpretation of the Book of Daniel, frequently interpreted by secular scholars as a second-century diatribe against Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who persecuted the Jews and ... The Book of Revelation contains even more vehement imagery, which many secular scholars believe was directed against the Roman empire ...

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