Bone Destruction Patterns in Periodontal Disease

Bone Destruction Patterns In Periodontal Disease

In periodontal disease, not only does the bone that supports the teeth, known as alveolar bone, reduce in height in relation to the teeth, but the morphology of the remaining alveolar bone is altered. The bone destruction patterns that occur as a result of periodontal disease generally take on characteristic forms.

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Bone Destruction Patterns In Periodontal Disease - Types of Destruction - Vertical Defects
... Vertical defects occur adjacent to a tooth and usually in the form of a triangular area of missing bone, known as triangulation. ...

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