Bolivarian Revolution

Bolivarian Revolution

The “Bolivarian Revolution” refers to a leftist social movement and political process in Venezuela led by Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez, the founder of the Fifth Republic Movement (replaced by the United Socialist Party of Venezuela in 2007). The "Bolivarian Revolution" is named after Simón Bolívar, an early 19th century Venezuelan and Latin American revolutionary leader, prominent in the Spanish American wars of independence in achieving the independence of most of northern Latin America from Spanish rule. According to Chávez and other supporters, the "Bolivarian Revolution" seeks to build a mass movement to implement Bolivarianism - popular democracy, economic independence, equitable distribution of revenues, and an end to political corruption - in Venezuela. They interpret Bolívar's ideas from a socialist perspective.

On his 57th birthday, while announcing that he was being treated for cancer, Chavez announced that he had changed the slogan of the Bolivarian Revolution from “Motherland, socialism, or death” to “Socialist motherland and victory, we will live, and we will come out victorious.”

Read more about Bolivarian Revolution:  Background: Bolivarianism, Policies, Internationalism

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Bolivarianism - Components
... Fernando Soto Rojas Supreme Tribunal Political parties Bolivarianism Bolivarian Revolution Bolivarian Missions Elections Parliamentary 2000, 2005, 2010 Presidential ... That included the 1999 Constitution, which changed Venezuela's name to the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, and other ideas such as the Bolivarian Schools ...
Bolivarian Revolution - Internationalism
... This section does not cite any references or sources The "Bolivarian Revolution" under Chávez has also refocused Venezuelan foreign policy on Latin American economic and social integration by enacting ...

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    If the Revolution has the right to destroy bridges and art monuments whenever necessary, it will stop still less from laying its hand on any tendency in art which, no matter how great its achievement in form, threatens to disintegrate the revolutionary environment or to arouse the internal forces of the Revolution, that is, the proletariat, the peasantry and the intelligentsia, to a hostile opposition to one another. Our standard is, clearly, political, imperative and intolerant.
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