Boiling Water Reactors - Evolution of The BWR - The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR)

The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR)

During a period beginning in the late 1990s, GE engineers proposed to combine the features of the advanced boiling water reactor design with the distinctive safety features of the simplified boiling water reactor design, along with scaling up the resulting design to a larger size of 1,600 MWe (4,500 MWth). This Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor design has been submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for approval, and the subsequent Final Design Review is near completion.

Reportedly, this design has been advertised as having a core damage probability of only 3×10−8 core damage events per reactor-year. (That is, there would need to be 3 million ESBWRs operating before one would expect a single core-damaging event during their 100-year lifetimes. Earlier designs of the BWR (the BWR/4) had core damage probabilities as high as 1×10−5 core-damage events per reactor-year.) This extraordinarily low CDP for the ESBWR far exceeds the other large LWRs on the market.

Read more about this topic:  Boiling Water Reactors, Evolution of The BWR

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