Blind Men and An Elephant

The story of the blind men and an elephant originated in Indian subcontinent from where it has widely diffused. It has been used to illustrate a range of truths and fallacies. At various times it has provided insight into the relativism, opaqueness or inexpressible nature of truth, the behaviour of experts in fields where there is a deficit or inaccessibility of information, the need for communication, and respect for different perspectives.

It is a parable that has crossed between many religious traditions and is part of Jain, Buddhist, Sufi and Hindu lore. The tale is also well known in Europe. In the 19th century the poet John Godfrey Saxe created his own version as a poem. Since then, the story has been published in many books for adults and children, and interpreted in an ever-increasing variety of ways.

Read more about Blind Men And An Elephant:  The Story, Jain, Buddhist, Sufi Muslim, Hindu, John Godfrey Saxe, Modern Treatments

Other articles related to "blind men and an elephant, blind men, elephant, blind":

Blind Men And An Elephant - Modern Treatments
... In biology, the way the blind men hold onto different parts of the elephant has been seen as a good analogy for the Polyclonal B cell response ... under examination is the hide of an African elephant ... by Paul Galdone and another, Seven Blind Mice, by Ed Young (1992) ...

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