Biological Tissue - Animal Tissues

Animal Tissues

Animal tissues can be grouped into four basic types: connective, muscle, nervous, and epithelial. Multiple tissue types comprise organs and body structures. While all animals can generally be considered to contain the four tissue types, the manifestation of these tissues can differ depending on the type of organism. For example, the origin of the cells comprising a particular tissue type may differ developmentally for different classifications of animals.

The epithelium in all animals is derived from the ectoderm and endoderm with a small contribution from the mesoderm, forming the endothelium, a specialized type of epithelium that comprises the vasculature. By contrast, a true epithelial tissue is present only in a single layer of cells held together via occluding junctions called tight junctions, to create a selectively permeable barrier. This tissue covers all organismal surfaces that come in contact with the external environment such as the skin, the airways, and the digestive tract. It serves functions of protection, secretion, and absorption, and is separated from other tissues below by a basal lamina.

Read more about this topic:  Biological Tissue

Other articles related to "animal tissues, tissues, tissue":

Biological Tissue - Animal Tissues - Epithelial Tissue
... The epithelial tissues are formed by cells that cover the organ surfaces such as the surface of the skin, the airways, the reproductive tract, and the inner lining of the digestive tract ... an epithelial layer are linked via semi-permeable, tight junctions hence, this tissue provides a barrier between the external environment and the organ it covers ... to this protective function, epithelial tissue may also be specialized to function in secretion and absorption ...

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