Biological Immortality

Biological immortality refers to a stable or decreasing rate of mortality from cellular senescence as a function of chronological age. Various unicellular and multicellular species may achieve this state either throughout their existence or after living long enough. A biologically immortal living thing can still die from means other than senescence, such as through injury or disease.

This definition of immortality has been challenged in the new Handbook of the Biology of Aging, because the increase in rate of mortality as a function of chronological age may be negligible at extremely old ages, an idea referred to as the late-life mortality plateau. The rate of mortality may cease to increase in old age, but in most cases that rate is typically very high. As a hypothetical example, there is only a 50% chance of a human surviving another year at age 110 or greater.

Read more about Biological ImmortalityCell Lines, Organisms, Political Struggle For Immortalism and Immortality, Life Extensionists

Other articles related to "biological immortality":

List Of Long-living Organisms - Biological Immortality
... If the mortality rate remains constant, the rate determines the mean lifespan ... The lifespan can be long or short, even though the species technically "does not age" ...
Biological Immortality - Life Extensionists
... Biogerontologist Marios Kyriazis suggested that biological immortality in humans is an inevitable consequence of natural evolution ...

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