Billy Sunday

Billy Sunday

William Ashley "Billy" Sunday (November 19, 1862 – November 6, 1935) was an American athlete who, after being a popular outfielder in baseball's National League during the 1880s, became the most celebrated and influential American evangelist during the first two decades of the 20th century.

Born into poverty in Iowa, Sunday spent some years at the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home before working at odd jobs and playing for local running and baseball teams. His speed and agility provided him the opportunity to play baseball in the major leagues for eight years, where he was an average hitter and a good fielder known for his base-running.

Converted to evangelical Christianity in the 1880s, Sunday left baseball for the Christian ministry. He gradually developed his skills as a pulpit evangelist in the Midwest and then, during the early 20th century, he became the nation's most famous evangelist with his colloquial sermons and frenetic delivery. Sunday held widely reported campaigns in America's largest cities, and he attracted the largest crowds of any evangelist before the advent of electronic sound systems. He also made a great deal of money and was welcomed into the homes of the wealthy and influential. Sunday was a strong supporter of Prohibition, and his preaching almost certainly played a significant role in the adoption of the Eighteenth Amendment in 1919.

Despite questions about his income, no scandal ever touched Sunday. He was sincerely devoted to his wife, who also managed his campaigns, but his three sons disappointed him. His audiences grew smaller during the 1920s as Sunday grew older, religious revivals became less popular, and alternative sources of entertainment appeared. Nevertheless, Sunday continued to preach and remained a stalwart defender of conservative Christianity until his death.

Read more about Billy Sunday:  Early Life, Professional Baseball Player, Conversion, Marriage, Apprenticeship For Evangelism, Religious Views, Social and Political Views, Decline and Death

Other articles related to "billy sunday, sunday, sundays":

Billy Sunday - Decline and Death
... Sunday's popularity waned after World War I when many people in his revival audiences were attracted to radio broadcasts and moving pictures instead ... The Sundays' health also declined even as they continued to drive themselves through rounds of revivals—smaller but also with ever fewer staff members to assist them ... Tragedy marred Sunday's final years ...

Famous quotes containing the words sunday and/or billy:

    Rats!
    They fought the dogs and killed the cats,
    And bit the babies in the cradles,
    And ate the cheeses out of the vats,
    And licked the soup from the cooks’ own ladles,
    Split open the kegs of salted sprats,
    Made nests inside men’s Sunday hats,
    And even spoiled the women’s chats
    By drowning their speaking
    With shrieking and squeaking
    In fifty different sharps and flats.
    Robert Browning (1812–1889)

    “Oh, where have you been, Billy boy, Billy boy?
    Oh, where have you been, charming Billy?”
    “I’ve been to seek a wife,
    She’s the joy of my life,
    She’s a young thing, and cannot leave her mother.”
    —Unknown. Billy Boy (l. 1–5)