Betty Friedan

Betty Friedan (February 4, 1921 – February 4, 2006) was an American writer, activist, and feminist.

A leading figure in the Women's Movement in the United States, her 1963 book The Feminine Mystique is often credited with sparking the "second wave" of American feminism in the 20th century. In 1966, Friedan founded and was elected the first president of the National Organization for Women, which aimed to bring women "into the mainstream of American society now fully equal partnership with men".

In 1970, after stepping down as NOW's first president, Friedan organized the nation-wide Women's Strike for Equality on August 26, the 50th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution granting women the right to vote. The national strike was successful beyond expectations in broadening the feminist movement; the march led by Friedan in New York City alone attracted over 50,000 women and men. In 1971, Friedan joined other leading feminists to establish the National Women's Political Caucus. Friedan was also a strong supporter of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the United States Constitution that passed the United States House of Representatives (by a vote of 354-24) and Senate (84-8) following intense pressure by women's groups led by NOW in the early 1970s. Following Congressional passage of the amendment Friedan advocated for ratification of the amendment in the states and supported other women's rights reforms. Friedan founded the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws but was later critical of the abortion-centered, politicized tactics of many liberal and radical feminists.

Regarded as an influential author and intellectual in the United States, Friedan remained active in politics and advocacy for the rest of her life, authoring six books. As early as the 1960s Friedan was critical of polarized and extreme factions of feminism that attacked groups such as men and homemakers. One of her later books, The Second Stage, critiqued what Friedan saw as the extremist excesses of some feminists who could be broadly classified as gender feminists.

Read more about Betty FriedanEarly Life, Influence, Personality, Personal Life, Bibliography

Other articles related to "betty friedan, friedan":

Feminism In The United States - Second Wave
... In the early 1960s Betty Friedan wrote a controversial book entitled The Feminine Mystique in which she critiqued the patterns of middle class women in the United States at the current time ... Furthermore, Betty Friedan began encouraging women to strive to find their own callings in life and seek other personal and professional roles in a society that was deemed male-dom ... In 1966, roughly 30 women including Betty Friedan formed National Organization for Women where they sought to bring awareness to all the limited access women have had in mainstream society ...
History Of Feminism - Waves of Feminism - Second Wave - Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, and The Rise of Women's Liberation
... In 1963, Betty Friedan published her exposé The Feminine Mystique, giving a voice to the discontent and disorientation many women felt in being shunted into homemaking positions after graduating from ... In the book, Friedan explored the roots of the change in women's roles from essential workforce during World War II to homebound housewife and mother ...
NARAL Pro-Choice America - History
... journalist Lawrence Lader, and women's rights advocate Betty Friedan ... or to preserve the life or health of the mother—and those led by Betty Friedan and Conni Bille, favoring abortion rights at the discretion of the mother ... Marc Hughes Fisher, Betty Friedan, Norval Morris, Stewart Mott, Dr ...

Famous quotes by betty friedan:

    If women’s role in life is limited solely to housewife/mother, it clearly ends when she can no longer bear more children and the children she has borne leave home.
    Betty Friedan (20th century)

    The feminine mystique has succeeded in burying millions of American women alive.
    Betty Friedan (b. 1921)

    The suburban housewife—she was the dream image of the young American women and the envy, it was said, of women all over the world. The American housewife—freed by science and labor-saving appliances from the drudgery, the dangers of childbirth, and the illnesses of her grandmother ... had found true feminine fulfilment.
    Betty Friedan (b. 1921)

    It is better for a woman to compete impersonally in society, as men do, than to compete for dominance in her own home with her husband, compete with her neighbors for empty status, and so smother her son that he cannot compete at all.
    Betty Friedan (b. 1921)

    We need to see men and women as equal partners, but it’s hard to think of movies that do that. When I talk to people, they think of movies of forty-five years ago! Hepburn and Tracy!
    Betty Friedan (b. 1921)