Benjamin Robins - Early Life

Early Life

Benjamin Robins was born in Bath. His parents were Quakers in poor circumstances, and as a result, he received very little formal education. Having come to London on the advice of Dr. Henry Pemberton (1694–1771), who had recognised Robins' talents, for a time he maintained himself by teaching mathematics, but soon devoted himself to engineering and the study of fortification.

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