Benjamin Peirce

Benjamin Peirce ( /ˈpɜrs/; April 4, 1809 – October 6, 1880) was an American mathematician who taught at Harvard University for approximately 50 years. He made contributions to celestial mechanics, statistics, number theory, algebra, and the philosophy of mathematics.

He was the son of Benjamin Peirce (1778–1831), later librarian of Harvard, and Lydia Ropes Nichols Peirce (1781–1868).

After graduating from Harvard, he remained as a tutor (1829), and was subsequently appointed professor of mathematics in 1831. He added astronomy to his portfolio in 1842, and remained as Harvard professor until his death. In addition, he was instrumental in the development of Harvard's science curriculum, served as the college librarian, and was director of the U.S. Coast Survey from 1867 to 1874.

Read more about Benjamin Peirce:  Research, Private Life, Eponyms, Works

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Benjamin Peirce - Works
... Linear Associative Algebra, lithograph by Peirce 1872 ... corrections, notes, and an added 1875 paper by Peirce, plus notes by his son Charles Sanders Peirce, published in the American Journal of Mathematics v ...

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