Benjamin - Benjamin's Sons

Benjamin's Sons

According to Genesis 46:21, Benjamin had ten sons: Bela, Becher, Ashbel, Gera, Naaman, Ehi, Rosh, Muppim, Huppim, and Ard. The name of his wife/wives are not given. Classical rabbinical tradition adds that each son's name honors Joseph:

  • Belah (meaning swallow), in reference to Joseph disappearing (being swallowed up)
  • Becher (meaning first born), in reference to Joseph being the first child of Rachel
  • Ashbel (meaning capture), in reference to Joseph having suffered captivity
  • Gera (meaning grain), in reference to Joseph living in a foreign land (Egypt)
  • Naaman (meaning grace), in reference to Joseph having graceful speech
  • Ehi (meaning my brother), in reference to Joseph being Benjamin's only full-brother (as opposed to half-brothers)
  • Rosh (meaning elder), in reference to Joseph being older than Benjamin
  • Muppim (meaning double mouth), in reference to Joseph passing on what he had been taught by Jacob
  • Huppim (meaning marriage canopies), in reference to Joseph being married in Egypt, while Benjamin was not there
  • Ard (meaning wanderer/fugitive), in reference to Joseph being like a rose
Children of Jacob by wife in order of birth
(D = Daughter)
Leah
  • Reuben (1)
  • Simeon (2)
  • Levi (3)
  • Judah (4)
  • Issachar (9)
  • Zebulun (10)
  • Dinah (D)
Rachel
  • Joseph (11)
  • Benjamin (12)
Bilhah (Rachel's servant)
  • Dan (5)
  • Naphtali (6)
Zilpah (Leah's servant)
  • Gad (7)
  • Asher (8)

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