Benjamin - Benjamin in Islam

Benjamin in Islam

The Qur'an, in the narrative of Joseph, refers to Benjamin as the righteous youngest son of Jacob. Islamic tradition, however, does not provide much detail regarding Benjamin's life and refers to him as being born from Jacob's wife Rachel, and further links a connection, as does Jewish tradition, between the names of Benjamin's children and Joseph.

Read more about this topic:  Benjamin

Other articles related to "benjamin":

William W. Rice - Rice Family and Relations
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... Benjamin (Ben) Jennings Caddy (November 1881 - 13 March 1955) was a militant trade unionist who is regarded as the doyen of the trade union movement in South Africa ... Persondata Name Caddy, Benjamin Alternative names Short description Date of birth 1881 Place of birth Date of death 13 March 1955 Place of death ...

Famous quotes containing the words islam and/or benjamin:

    Sooner or later we must absorb Islam if our own culture is not to die of anemia.
    Basil Bunting (1900–1985)

    The power of a text is different when it is read from when it is copied out.... Only the copied text thus commands the soul of him who is occupied with it, whereas the mere reader never discovers the new aspects of his inner self that are opened by the text, that road cut through the interior jungle forever closing behind it: because the reader follows the movement of his mind in the free flight of day-dreaming, whereas the copier submits it to command.
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