Belted Plaid

The belted plaid (or a plaid worn belted) is a large blanket-like piece of fabric which is wrapped around one's body with the material pleated or, more accurately, loosely gathered and secured at the waist by means of a belt. Typically, a portion of the belted plaid hangs down to about the knees with the rest of the material being wrapped up around one's upper body in a variety of ways and pinned or otherwise secured to keep it in place.

The belted plaid was a standard item of men's Highland dress from the late 16th century until the middle of the 18th century. It was also the precursor of the modern tailored kilt.

Read more about Belted PlaidTerminology, Description and History, The Kilt At Highland Games Today, Gallery Images

Other articles related to "belted plaid, plaid, belted":

History Of The Kilt - The Great Kilt
... The Breacan an Fhéilidh (belted plaid) or Feileadh Mòr (great plaid) is likely to have evolved over the course of the 16th century from the earlier 'brat' or woollen cloak (also known as ... the cloak had grown to such a size that it began to be gathered up and belted ... The belted plaid was originally a length of thick woollen cloth made up from two loom widths sewn together to give a total width of 54 to 60 inches, and up to 7 yards (6.4 m) in length ...
Belted Plaid - Gallery Images
... Modern belted plaid, front view Modern belted plaid, rear view. ...
History Of The Kilt - The Small Kilt or Walking Kilt
... It was thought that the traditional Highland kilt, the "belted plaid" which consisted of a large cloak, was inconvenient for tree cutters ... of Highlanders wearing only the bottom part of the belted plaid that date long before Rawlinson ever set foot in Scotland ... likely came about as a natural evolution of the belted plaid and Rawlinson probably observed it and quickly deduced its usefulness in his situation and ...

Famous quotes containing the word plaid:

    The world is never the same as it was.... And that’s as it should be. Every generation has the obligation to make the preceding generation irrelevant. It happens in little ways: no longer knowing the names of bands or even recognizing their sounds of music; no longer implicitly understanding life’s rules: wearing plaid Bermuda shorts to the grocery and not giving it another thought.
    Jim Shahin (20th century)