Beijing Television Cultural Center Fire

The Beijing Television Cultural Center fire was a massive blaze on 9 February 2009, in the centre of Beijing, involving the uncompleted Television Cultural Center (TVCC) building. The building was adjacent to the CCTV Headquarters, is owned by China Central Television, and was scheduled for completion in May 2009. Currently, the BTCC is being rebuilt.

At 8:27 p.m. on 9 February 2009, the entire building caught fire on the last day of the festivities marking the Chinese new year and was put out six hours later. A nearby unauthorised fireworks display caused the fire. A rumor originating in Taiwan claims that two Chinese expats had deliberately sent fireworks towards the building as a means of protest.

The incident, and its coverage by Chinese state media, caused a furor in China. CCTV officials had authorised the powerful pyrotechnics, carried it out without the required permit from local government, and ignored repeated police warnings not to hold them. The authorities' attempts to limit damaging direct coverage of the blaze was criticised by citizens and the international press.

Read more about Beijing Television Cultural Center Fire:  Background, The Fire, Internet Users in China, Rebuilding, Additional Source

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