Beating Brain Fog - 3 Key Tips For Mental Clarity

Famous quotes containing the words tips, mental, key, clarity, brain, beating and/or fog:

    A new idea is rarely born like Venus attended by graces
    More commonly it’s modeled of baling wire and acne.
    More commonly it wheezes and tips over.
    Marge Piercy (b. 1936)

    Dining-out is a vice, a dissipation of spirit punished by remorse. We eat, drink and talk a little too much, abuse all our friends, belch out our literary preferences and are egged on by accomplices in the audience to acts of mental exhibitionism. Such evenings cannot fail to diminish those who take part in them.
    Cyril Connolly (1903–1974)

    Woe unto you, lawyers! for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.
    Bible: New Testament Jesus, in Luke, 11:52.

    How to attain sufficient clarity of thought to meet the terrifying issues now facing us, before it is too late, is ... important. Of one thing I feel reasonably sure: we can’t stop to discuss whether the table has or hasn’t legs when the house is burning down over our heads. Nor do the classics per se seem to furnish the kind of education which fits people to cope with a fast-changing civilization.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877–?)

    The true charm of pedestrianism does not lie in the walking, or in the scenery, but in the talking. The walking is good to time the movement of the tongue by, and to keep the blood and the brain stirred up and active; the scenery and the woodsy smells are good to bear in upon a man an unconscious and unobtrusive charm and solace to eye and soul and sense; but the supreme pleasure comes from the talk.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    Women can stand a beating except when it is with their own weapons.
    Samuel Butler (1835–1902)

    Like a man traveling in foggy weather, those at some distance before him on the road he sees wrapped up in the fog, as well as those behind him, and also the people in the fields on each side, but near him all appears clear, though in truth he is as much in the fog as any of them.
    Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790)