Beast and The Harlot

"Beast and the Harlot" is a song by American heavy metal band Avenged Sevenfold, the song was released as a single taken from their third album City of Evil. The song peaked at #19 on the U.S. Mainstream Rock chart, #47 on the UK Singles Chart., and #1 on the UK Rock Chart in 12 March 2006.

The actual song is about the fall of Babylon from the Book of Revelation (particularly chapter seventeen), from which many quotes are taken, such as "Seven headed beast, ten horns raise from his head", "hatred strips her and leaves her naked", and other references. The Harlot referred to in the song is Great Babylon, quoted in the song, "Fallen now is Babylon the great." On Avenged Sevenfold's All Excess DVD, Tony Petrossian, who directed the video, says that M. Shadows' lyrics for this song about the fall of Babylon is comparing Babylon to Hollywood, showing many Hollywood clich├ęs such as the young, innocent boys being corrupted and losing their souls. In the music video the Harlot was played by actress Elizabeth Melendez.

Read more about Beast And The HarlotOverview, Track Listings, Inspiration, Personnel

Famous quotes containing the words beast and, harlot and/or beast:

    For man, the vast marvel is to be alive. For man, as for flower and beast and bird, the supreme triumph is to be most vividly, most perfectly alive. Whatever the unborn may know, they cannot know the beauty, the marvel of being alive in the flesh. The dead may look after the afterwards. But the magnificent here and now of life in the flesh is ours, and ours alone, and ours only for a time.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    If a woman hasn’t got a tiny streak of a harlot in her, she’s a dry stick as a rule.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    “Our snowstorms as a rule
    Aren’t looked on as man-killers, and although
    I’d rather be the beast that sleeps the sleep
    Under it all, his door sealed up and lost,
    Than the man fighting it to keep above it,
    Yet think of the small birds at roost and not
    In nests....”
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)