Battle of Hightower - Battle of Hightower

Battle of Hightower

Word of the massacre spread quickly and John Sevier raised a force to combat the Cherokee. The Cherokee force split up with some heading toward Kentucky and some toward North Carolina, but most headed toward Georgia. Sevier's men caught the Cherokee at the village of what he called Hightower (Etowah, or Itawayi), which is near the present-day site of Rome, Georgia. The Cherokee created a defensive position on Myrtle Hill and used a guard to try to prevent Sevier from fording the rivers.

Sevier left a written account of the battle, in which he described an attempt to cross the Etowah River about a mile south of Myrtle Hill, drawing the Cherokee defenders out of their prepared positions, then galloping back to Myrtle Hill to cross there. The Cherokee rushed back to contest the crossing of the Etowah, but failed. When Kingfisher was killed, the remaining warriors fled, and Sevier burned the village.

Read more about this topic:  Battle Of Hightower

Other articles related to "battle of hightower, battles, battle, hightower":

Battle Of Hightower - Aftermath
... The "Battle of Hightower" was Sevier's last of many battles against Native Americans and came to be known as his Etowah campaign ... It was the last pitched battle between the Lower Cherokee under John Watts and American forces until the Nickajack Expedition in September 1794 ... and there is a stone on the hill memorializing this battle ...
Myrtle Hill Cemetery - History - Battle of Hightower
... Sevier's men caught the Cherokee at the village of what he called Hightower (Etowah, or Itawayi), which is near the present-day site of Cartersville, Georgia ... Sevier left a written account of the battle, in which he described an attempt to cross the Etowah River about a mile south of Myrtle Hill, drawing the Cherokee defenders out of ... Evidence of the battle was found in the form of Cherokee bones and relics in the crevasses of the hill ...

Famous quotes containing the words battle of and/or battle:

    Joshua fit de battle ob Jerico, Jerico, Jerico,
    Joshua fit de battle ob Jerico,
    An’ de walls come tumblin’ down.
    —Unknown. Joshua Fit De Battle of Jericho (l. 1–3)

    War consisteth not in battle only, or the act of fighting; but in a tract of time, wherein the will to contend by battle is sufficiently known.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679)