Battle of Changde

The Battle of Changde (simplified Chinese: 常德会战; traditional Chinese: 常德會戰; pinyin: Chángdé Huìzhàn) was a major engagement in the Second Sino-Japanese War in and around the Chinese city of Changde in the province of Hunan. During the battle, Japan extensively used biological and chemical weapons.

The purpose of the Japanese offensive was not to hold the city, but to maintain pressure on the Chinese National Revolutionary Army "in order to destroy their main units, to deny them the time needed for recuperation, regrouping, and retraining, and to make sure that no Chinese troops could be spared for the Burma front."

Although the Japanese army initially successfully captured the city, the Chinese 57th division was able to pin them down long enough for reinforcements to arrive and encircle the Japanese. The Chinese army then cut off the Japanese supply lines, forcing them into retreat, whereupon the Chinese pursued their enemy.

Contemporary Western newspapers depicted the battle as a Chinese victory. American government film footage shows victorious Chinese troops with Japanese prisoners and captured Japanese flags and equipment on display after the battle. In addition, an American newsreel titled "Chinese troops drive Japs from Changteh" showed Chinese troops firing, with dead and captured Japanese on display.

Read more about Battle Of ChangdeBattle, Biological and Chemical Attacks, Conclusion, Gallery

Other articles related to "battle of changde, changde":

Battle Of Changde - Gallery
... soldier crouches before his Chinese captors at Changde Japanese prisoners at Changde ...

Famous quotes containing the words battle of and/or battle:

    The battle of the North Atlantic is a grim business, and it isn’t going to be won by charm and personality.
    Edmund H. North, British screenwriter, and Lewis Gilbert. First Sea Lord (Laurence Naismith)

    It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore, and to see ships tossed upon the sea: a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle, and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to standing upon the vantage ground of truth ... and to see the errors, and wanderings, and mists, and tempests, in the vale below.
    Francis Bacon (1561–1626)