Battle Honours

Some articles on battle, battle honours, battle honour:

Cheshire Regiment - History
... In 1690, the 22nd fought in the Battle of Boyne, and in 1691 at the Battle of Aughrim ... Minorca where it remained for the next 22 years, although a detachment was present at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, during the War of the Austrian Succession ... The 22nd Foot received two battle honours for taking part in the capture of Martinique and the British expedition against Cuba during 1762 ...
Canadian Mountie - A Regiment of Dragoons
... Motto Maintiens le droit (Defend the law) Battle honours see Battle honours Commanders Current commander Bob Paulson (Commissioner) Commissioner-in-Chief HM The Queen Honorary ...
Peel And Dufferin Regiment - History - The Peel and Dufferin Regiment (1923–1936)
... pending a decision on the granting of battle honours to militia regiments ... The battle honours assigned to The Peel and Dufferin Regiment in 1930 were Ypres, 1915 '17, Festubert 1915, Somme 1916, Arras 1917, '18, Hill 70, Amiens ... Defense approved the design for the regimental colour, incorporating these battle honours, and on 22 May 1930 the Governor-General, Viscount Willingdon, presented the colour on ...
14th Light Horse Regiment (Australia) - History
... contingents from a number of Australian colonies and it was here that the unit won its first battle honour ... the Australian Army were changed again, this time removing mounted troops from the order of battle altogether ... and the Sinai and had earned a number of battle honours, which the 14th subsequently inherited ...

Famous quotes containing the words honours and/or battle:

    If a novel reveals true and vivid relationships, it is a moral work, no matter what the relationships consist in. If the novelist honours the relationship in itself, it will be a great novel.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    Nelson’s famous signal before the Battle of Trafalgar was not: “England expects that every man will be a hero.” It said: “England expects that every man will do his duty.” In 1805 that was enough. It should still be.
    Johan Huizinga (1872–1945)