Banknotes of Zimbabwe - Paper Money of The Third Dollar (ZWR)

Paper Money of The Third Dollar (ZWR)

The 2007 banknote series was prepared by the Reserve Bank in October 2006 for the abandoned second phase of Operation Sunrise. The Chiremba Balancing Rocks was to be reinstated as the main feature on the obverse whilst use of the Zimbabwe Bird watermark continued. There were additional security features as opposed to previous issues, which included security threads, see-through register marks and recognition marks for the partially sighted. Holographic security threads and Optically Variable Ink were used on the $100, $500 and $1 000 notes. When the redenomination of 1 August 2008 occurred these notes were put into circulation as banknotes of the third dollar between 1 August 2008 to 31 December 2008.

The 2008 banknote series circulated from 29 September 2008 to 12 April 2009. The series demonstrated the intensity of hyperinflation during the period as the highest denomination increased from $1 000 to $100 trillion ($1014) by January 2009, the latter being the largest denomination issued by the Reserve Bank. The first issues of the series were the $10 000 and $20 000 denominations. These were followed by the following denominations:

  • $50 000 (13 October 2008)
  • $100 000, $500 000 and $1 million (3 November 2008)
  • $10 million, $50 million and $100 million (4 December 2008)
  • $200 million and $500 million (12 December 2008)
  • $1 billion, $5 billion and $10 billion notes (19 December 2008)
  • $20 billion and $50 billion notes (12 January 2009)
  • $10 trillion, $20 trillion, $50 trillion and $100 trillion (16 January 2009)

The large number of denominations issued in late-2008 as well as the suspension of paper supply by Giesecke & Devrient affected the Reserve Bank's ability to maintain the quality of the banknotes. Consequently most design features were copied from the 2007 banknote series and lack many modern security features that were being relied upon by banknotes of major currencies such as those of the Canadian Dollar. The notes denominated from $20 000 to $500 000 and then from $10 million onwards used non-watermarked paper, whilst the $500 million notes were printed on pure cotton. A silhouette of the Zimbabwe Bird in Optically Variable Ink was used in such notes to compensate for this but the iridescent strip was dropped for higher denominations. The $10 000 and $1 000 000 notes were printed on paper intended for the $1 000 notes (Pick no. 72), thereby carrying the embedded holographic thread and watermark. Two types of paper (regular and lined) were used on $20 000, $50 000 and $500 000 banknotes.

2007 banknote series (Signature: Dr. G. Gono, Capital: Harare)
Pick
No.
Image Value
($)
Dimensions Main Colour Description Date of
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse Watermark printing circulation Withdrawal
65 1 68 × 134 mm Claret Chiremba Balancing Rocks Victoria Falls and African buffalo Zimbabwe Bird and denomination October 2006 1 August 2008 31 December 2008
66 5 68 × 140 mm Brown Kariba Dam and elephant
67 10 70 × 142 mm Green Farm tractor and silo towers
68 20 72 × 146 mm Red Grain belt and miner
69 100 73 × 149 mm Blue Great Zimbabwe ruins and trees of Aloe excelsa
70 500 75 × 150 mm Violet Milking farm and bull
71 1 000 76 × 153 mm Orange Parliament, Anglican St. Mary's Cathedral and Reserve Bank buildings 17 September 2008
2008 banknote series (Signature: Dr. G. Gono, Capital: Harare)
Pick
No.
Image Value
($)
Dimensions Main Colour Description Date of
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse Watermark circulation Withdrawal
72 10 000 76 × 153 mm Brown Chiremba Balancing Rocks Combine harvester and tractor Zimbabwe Bird and "1000" 29 September 2008 12 April 2009
73a 20 000 74 × 148 mm Olive Victoria Falls and Kariba Dam None
73b Horizontal lines
74a 50 000 Green Farm tractor and miner None 13 October 2008
74b Horizontal lines
75 100 000 Indigo African buffalo and elephant None 5 November 2008
76a 500 000 Olive Trees of Aloe excelsa and milking farm
76b Horizontal lines
77 1 000 000 76 × 153 mm Blue Great Zimbabwe ruins and bull Zimbabwe Bird and "1000"
78 10 000 000 74 × 148 mm Indigo Parliament building, Anglican St. Mary's Cathedral and Great Zimbabwe ruins None 4 December 2008
79 50 000 000 Teal African buffalo and Great Zimbabwe ruins
80 100 000 000 Red Grain belt and silo towers
81 200 000 000 Brown Parliament buildings, Anglican St. Mary's Cathedral and Heroes’ Acre 12 December 2008
82 500 000 000 Violet Milking farm and miner
83 1 000 000 000
($109)
Green Trees of Aloe excelsa and elephant 19 December 2008
84a 5 000 000 000
($5×109)
Pink Farm tractor and milking farm
84b Pink (lighter shades)
85 10 000 000 000
(1010)
Indigo Kariba Dam and miner
86 20 000 000 000
(2×1010)
Olive-orange Great Zimbabwe ruins and trees of Aloe excelsa 12 January 2009
87 50 000 000 000
(5×1010)
Orange Great Zimbabwe ruins and Reserve Bank building
88 10 000 000 000 000
(1013)
Green 16 January 2009
89 20 000 000 000 000
(2×1013)
Red Miner and grain silo
90 50 000 000 000 000
(5×1013)
Teal Kariba Dam and elephant
91 100 000 000 000 000
(1014)
Blue Victoria Falls and Buffalo

Read more about this topic:  Banknotes Of Zimbabwe

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