Banish The Comb Over Hair Style Ideas For Bald Men

Famous quotes containing the words banish the, bald, men, ideas, banish, comb, hair and/or style:

    Men are the managers of the affairs of women
    for that God has preferred in bounty
    one of them over another, and for that
    they have expended of their property.
    Righteous women are therefore obedient,
    guarding the secret for God’s guarding.
    And those you fear may be rebellious
    admonish; banish them to their couches,
    and beat them.
    Qur’An. Women 4:38, ed. Arthur J. Arberry (1955)

    hopes dance best on bald men’s hair
    —E.E. (Edward Estlin)

    Will you tell me my fault, frankly as to yourself, for I had rather wince, than die. Men do not call the surgeon to commend the bone, but to set it, Sir.
    Emily Dickinson (1830–1886)

    Rock ‘n’ roll is a combination of good ideas dried up by fads, terrible junk, hideous failings in taste and judgment, gullibility and manipulation, moments of unbelievable clarity and invention, pleasure, fun, vulgarity, excess, novelty and utter enervation.
    Greil Marcus (b. 1945)

    Four spectres haunt the Poor—Old Age, Accident, Sickness and Unemployment. We are going to exorcise them. We are going to drive hunger from the hearth. We mean to banish the workhouse from the horizon of every workman in the land.
    David Lloyd George (1863–1945)

    So summer comes in the end to these few stains
    And the rust and rot of the door through which she went.
    The house is empty. But here is where she sat
    To comb her dewy hair, a touchless light,
    Perplexed by its darker iridescences.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    These women behind the store windows? Dreams, sir, dreams at bargain prices, a trip to the Indies! These people perfume themselves with spices. You enter, they close the curtains, and the trip begins. The gods descend on the nude bodies and the islands drift, demented, with the tousled hair of palm trees in the breeze.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    Who cares what a man’s style is, so it is intelligible,—as intelligible as his thought. Literally and really, the style is no more than the stylus, the pen he writes with; and it is not worth scraping and polishing, and gilding, unless it will write his thoughts the better for it. It is something for use, and not to look at. The question for us is, not whether Pope had a fine style, wrote with a peacock’s feather, but whether he uttered useful thoughts.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)