Banish The Comb Over Hair Style Ideas For Bald Men

Famous quotes containing the words bald men, banish the, bald, men, ideas, banish, comb, hair and/or style:

    hopes dance best on bald men’s hair
    —E.E. (Edward Estlin)

    Four spectres haunt the Poor—Old Age, Accident, Sickness and Unemployment. We are going to exorcise them. We are going to drive hunger from the hearth. We mean to banish the workhouse from the horizon of every workman in the land.
    David Lloyd George (1863–1945)

    The right moment wears a full head of hair: when it has been missed, you can’t get it back; it’s bald in the back of the head and never turns around.
    François Rabelais (1494–1553)

    We didn’t want any men in our group. They drink their loans, they don’t work their stores. Why should we have to pay for their irresponsibilities?
    Brachiate Guioth De Espinosa, Colombian storekeeper. As quoted in the New York Times, p. A6 (July 15, 1994)

    War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks nothing worth a war, is worse.... A war to protect other human beings against tyrannical injustice; a war to give victory to their own ideas of right and good, and which is their own war, carried on for an honest purpose by their own free choice—is often the means of their regeneration.
    John Stuart Mill (1806–1873)

    Pack, clouds, away, and welcome, day!
    With night we banish sorrow.
    Thomas Heywood (1575?–1650)

    So summer comes in the end to these few stains
    And the rust and rot of the door through which she went.
    The house is empty. But here is where she sat
    To comb her dewy hair, a touchless light,
    Perplexed by its darker iridescences.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    Oh! my God! the down,
    The soft young down of her, the brown,
    The brown of her—her eyes, her hair, her hair . . .
    Charlotte Mew (1870–1928)

    As the style of Faulkner grew out of his rage—out of the impotence of his rage—the style of Hemingway grew out of the depth and nuance of his disenchantment.
    Wright Morris (b. 1910)