Ballad Operas

Some articles on opera, operas, ballad, ballad operas, ballad opera:

Stephen Storace - The English Operas, 1787-1796
... which was - at that time - the home of the Royal Italian Opera, a troupe which enjoyed a Royal monopoly on the presentation of Italian opera, and in fact of any musical works which were through-composed without ... Stephen too worked at the King's Theatre as music director for some operas, including his own "La Cameriera Astuta," before moving in 1789 to the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, which at this time was under the ... To evade the Royal monopoly on opera at the King's Theatre, Sheridan presented a mixture of -type works specially written in English in the ballad-opera style, with "English'd ...
The Earliest Ballad Operas
... Ballad opera has been called an "eighteenth-century protest against the Italian conquest of the London operatic scene" It consists of racy and often ... It is generally accepted that the first ballad opera, and the one that was to prove the most successful, was The Beggar's Opera of 1728 ... A number of the tunes from this anthology were recycled in The Beggar's Opera ...
Pop Ballads - Ballad Operas
... In the 18th century ballad operas developed as a form of English stage entertainment, partly in opposition to the Italian domination of the London ... Rather than the more aristocratic themes and music of the Italian opera, the ballad operas were set to the music of popular folk songs and dealt with lower-class characters ... showed a suspension (or inversion) of the high moral values of the Italian opera of the period ...
List Of Opera Genres - List
... de Ramire (1745), Anacréon (1754), Rameau Afterpiece English 18th/early 19th century short opera or pantomime performed after a full-length play. 17th and early 18th century opera with religious subject ... (plural azioni teatrali) Italian Small-scale one-act opera, or musical play ...

Famous quotes containing the word ballad:

    During the cattle drives, Texas cowboy music came into national significance. Its practical purpose is well known—it was used primarily to keep the herds quiet at night, for often a ballad sung loudly and continuously enough might prevent a stampede. However, the cowboy also sang because he liked to sing.... In this music of the range and trail is “the grayness of the prairies, the mournful minor note of a Texas norther, and a rhythm that fits the gait of the cowboy’s pony.”
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