Ballad - Sentimental Ballads - Power Ballads

Power Ballads

Simon Frith identifies the origins of the power ballad in the emotional singing of soul artists, particularly Ray Charles and the adaptation of this style by figures such as Eric Burdon, Tom Jones and Joe Cocker to produce slow tempo songs often building to a loud and emotive chorus backed by drums, electric guitars and sometimes choirs. According to Charles Aaron, power ballads came into existence in the early 1970s, when rock stars attempted to convey profound messages to audiences. He argues that the power ballad broke into the mainstream of American consciousness in 1976 as FM radio gave a new lease of life to earlier songs like Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" (1971), Aerosmith's "Dream On" (1973), and Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Free Bird" (1974). Other notable examples include Nazareth's version of "Love Hurts" (1975), Foreigner's "I Want to Know What Love Is (1984)", Scorpions "Still Loving You" (1984), Heart's "What About Love" (1985), and Whitesnake's "Is This Love" (1987).

Read more about this topic:  Ballad, Sentimental Ballads

Other articles related to "power ballads, power ballad":

Seventies Power Ballads
... Seventies Power Ballads - The Greatest Driving Anthems in the World.. ... This album was released September 29, 2008 and includes some of the biggest power ballads the 1970s had to offer ...
Pop Ballads - Sentimental Ballads - Power Ballads
... and former rock critic, identifies the origins of the power ballad in the emotional singing of soul artists, particularly Ray Charles, and the adaptation ... According to Charles Aaron, power ballads came into existence in the early 1970s, when rock stars attempted to convey profound messages to audiences ... Aaron argues that the power ballad broke into the mainstream of American consciousness in 1976 as FM radio gave a new lease of life to earlier songs such as Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" (1971), Aerosmith's "Dre ...

Famous quotes containing the words ballads and/or power:

    I am hurt but I am not slaine;
    Ile lay mee downe and bleed a-while
    And then Ile rise and ffight againe.
    —Unknown. Sir Andrew Barton. . .

    English and Scottish Ballads (The Poetry Bookshelf)

    Now, and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consistently with the maintenance of government.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)