Bad

Bad or BAD may refer to:

Read more about BadAcronyms, Films, Music, Social Sciences, Geography, Other

Other articles related to "bad":

Bad Kreuznach (Verbandsgemeinde)
... The German Verbandsgemeinde of Bad Kreuznach includes the villages of Volxheim, Hackenheim, Tiefenthal, Pleitersheim, Pfaffen-Schwabenheim, Biebelsheim, Neu-Bamberg, Frei-Laubersheim and Fürfeld ... These villages lie south of the town of Bad Kreuznach ...
Voltlage
... Towns and municipalities in Osnabrück (district) Alfhausen Ankum Bad Essen Bad Iburg Bad Laer Bad Rothenfelde Badbergen Belm Berge Bersenbrück Bippen Bissendorf Bohmte Bramsche Dissen Eggermühlen ...
It's Dot Com - Cartoons - 20X6
... Exty-Six"), originated from a response to an email asking Strong Bad what he would look like if he were in an anime ... The main character, Stinkoman, is an anime version of Strong Bad with blue hair, a shiny body and robot boots ... Stinkoman's name comes from a conversation Homestar Runner and Strong Bad had while marooned on a desert island ...
Bad - Other
... BAD is the hexadecimal representation of 2989 Banda languages, ISO 639 alpha-3 code bad Little Miss Bad, a character in the Little Miss series of books by Roger Hargreaves ...

Famous quotes containing the word bad:

    There was a little girl
    Who had a little curl
    Right in the middle of her forehead,
    When she was good
    She was very, very good,
    But when she was bad she was horrid.
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1822)

    Shakespeare had no tutors but nature and genius. He caught his faults from the bad taste of his contemporaries. In an age still less civilized Shakespeare might have been wilder, but would not have been vulgar.
    Horace Walpole (1717–1797)

    The books one reads in childhood, and perhaps most of all the bad and good bad books, create in one’s mind a sort of false map of the world, a series of fabulous countries into which one can retreat at odd moments throughout the rest of life, and which in some cases can survive a visit to the real countries which they are supposed to represent.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)