Back-up Collision - Statistics

Statistics

According to research by the advocacy web site kidsandcars.org, back up collisions were the leading cause (34%) for U.S. non-traffic fatalities of children under 15 from 2006–2010.

The U.S. Center for Disease Control reported that from 2001–2003, an estimated 7,475 children (2,492 per year) under the age of 15 were treated for automobile back-over incidents. About 300 fatalities per year result from backup collisions.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that back-up collisions most often:

  • occur in residential driveways and parking lots
  • involve sport utility vehicles (SUVs) or small trucks
  • occur when a parent, relative or someone known to the family is driving
  • particularly affect children less than five years old

The driver of the car backing up and hitting an object, a person, or another car is usually considered to be at fault.

Read more about this topic:  Back-up Collision

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