Awards and Decorations of The United States Government

Awards and decorations of the United States government are civilian awards of the U.S. federal government which are typically issued for sustained meritorious service, in a civilian capacity, while serving in the U.S. federal government. Certain U.S. government awards may also be issued to military personnel of the United States armed forces and be worn in conjunction with awards and decorations of the United States military. In order of precedence, those U.S. non-military awards and decorations authorized for wear, are worn after U.S. military personal decorations and unit awards and before U.S. military campaign and service awards.

The following is a selection of civilian awards which are presently issued by the U.S. government.

Read more about Awards And Decorations Of The United States Government:  Office of The President of The United States, United States Congress, United States Intelligence Community, Department of Commerce, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Homeland Security, Department of The Interior, Department of Justice, Department of Transportation, Department of The Treasury, Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Science Foundation (NSF), Office of Personnel Management, Selective Service System, President's Council On Year 2000 Conversion

Famous quotes containing the words government, states, decorations and/or united:

    Plato says that the punishment which the wise suffer who refuse to take part in the government, is, to live under the government of worse men; and the like regret is suggested to all the auditors, as the penalty of abstaining to speak,—that they shall hear worse orators than themselves.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The mission of the United States is one of benevolent assimilation.
    William McKinley (1843–1901)

    Let the realist not mind appearances. Let him delegate to others the costly courtesies and decorations of social life. The virtues are economists, but some of the vices are also. Thus, next to humility, I have noticed that pride is a pretty good husband. A good pride is, as I reckon it, worth from five hundred to fifteen hundred a year.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    In one notable instance, where the United States Army and a hundred years of persuasion failed, a highway has succeeded. The Seminole Indians surrendered to the Tamiami Trail. From the Everglades the remnants of this race emerged, soon after the trail was built, to set up their palm-thatched villages along the road and to hoist tribal flags as a lure to passing motorists.
    —For the State of Florida, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)