Australian National Road Race Championships

The Australian National Road Race Championships, are held annually with an event for each category of rider: Men, Women & under 23 riders. The event also includes the Australian National Time Trial Championships since 2002. The Australian Championships were officially known as the Scody Australian Open Road Cycling Championships from 1999 to 2010, taking the name of their main sponsor. This changed to the Mars Cycling Australia Road National Championships from 2011 but they are more commonly referred to as The Nationals. The under 23 championships were introduced in 2001. Note that these results do not currently include the senior and junior amateur road race championships that were held prior to the open era.

The winners of each event are awarded with a symbolic cycling jersey featuring green and yellow stripes, which can be worn by the rider at other road racing events in the country to show their status as national champion. The champion's stripes can be combined into a sponsored rider's team kit design for this purpose.

Other articles related to "roads, road":

Road - Statistics
... The United States has the largest network of roads of any country with 4,050,717 miles (6,518,997 km) as of 2009 ... of China is second with 3,583,715 kilometres (2,226,817 mi) of road (2007) See List of countries by road network size ... The Republic of India has the third largest road system in the world with 3,383,344 kilometres (2,102,312 mi) (2002) ...
Zhongzhou Road
... Zhongzhou Road (simplified Chinese 中轴线 traditional Chinese 中軸綫 pinyin Zhōngzhóuxiàn), literally meaning "Central Axis", refers to a stretch of road in Beijing, China ... Zhongzhou Road" is not the name of any particular road it refers to the trunk road from Beichen Bridge on the northern 4th Ring Road through to Zhonglou North Bridge on the northern 2nd Ring Road (north ... In the Ming and Qing Dynasties Beijing's Zhongzhou Road is in turn from north to south, the bell tower, the drum tower, the Wanning bridge, Di'anmen (in 1954 demolition), Jingshan, the supernatural might gate ...
History Of St Albans - An Early Transport Hub
... Three main roads date from the medieval period - Holywell Hill, St Peter's Street, and Fishpool Street ... remained the only major streets until around 1800 when London Road was constructed, to be followed by Hatfield Road in 1824 and Verulam Road in 1826 ... Verulam Road was created specifically to aid the movement of stage coaches, since St Albans was the first major stop on the coaching route north from London ...
Neutral Moresnet - History - Borders
... of Neutral Moresnet had a more-or-less triangular shape with the base being the main road from Aachen to Liège ... The village and mine lay just to the north of this road ... While the roads leading from Germany and Belgium to the "Three Country Point" on the Vaalserberg today bear the names, respectively, of Dreiländerweg ("Three-Countries-Way ...

Famous quotes containing the words race, australian, national and/or road:

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