Augeas

In Greek mythology, Augeas (or Augeias, /ɔːˈdʒiːəs/, Ancient Greek: Αὐγείας), whose name means "bright", was king of Elis and father of Epicaste. Some say that Augeas was one of the Argonauts.

He is best known for his stables, which housed the single greatest number of cattle in the country and had never been cleaned — until the time of the great hero Heracles.

Augeas' lineage varies in the sources—he was said to be either the son of Helius and Nausidame, or of Eleios, king of Elis, and Nausidame, or of Poseidon, or of Phorbas and Hyrmine. His children were Epicaste, Phyleus, Agamede (who was the mother of Dictys by Poseidon), Agasthenes, and Eurytus.

Read more about Augeas:  The Fifth Labour of Heracles

Other articles related to "augeas":

Augeas - The Fifth Labour of Heracles
... Augeas was irate because he had promised Heracles one tenth of his cattle if the job was finished in one day ... Heracles gave his kingdom to Augeas' son Phyleus, who had been exiled for supporting Heracles against his father ... and slew also Eurytos, that he might wrest from tyrannous Augeas against his will reward for service done ...
Labours Of Heracles - Fifth Labour: Augean Stables
... Augeas was irate because he had promised Hercules one tenth of his cattle if the job was finished in one day ... Hercules gave his kingdom to Augeas' son Phyleus, who had been exiled for supporting Hercules against his father ... slew also Eurytos, that he might wrest from tyrannous Augeas against his will reward for service done ...