Auckland Savings Bank Building

Built in 1884 and located at 260 Queen Street, Auckland, this building was formerly owned by the Auckland Savings Bank. In 1977, the building became a McDonald's restaurant, the first in Auckland and only the second in New Zealand (behind Porirua). Much of the facade and interiors have been renovated and the original bank vault still remains in use as a stockroom.

Designed by Edward Bartley, the facade was inspired by Italian Renaissance palazzi, a style much used by commerce and banking during some eras. It is one of the few remaining buildings on Queen Street that is over a hundred years old.

Other articles related to "banks, savings, bank, saving":

Swisscontact - Projects - Financial Services
... Swisscontact does not grant microcredits, but instead assists local microcredit banks and savings and credit associations with advice and further ... facilitates SMEs’ access to savings and loan opportunities by Providing training opportunities for savings and loan cooperatives and other banking institutions Training bank staff in the ...
Saving For Education, Entrepreneurship, And Downpayment
... Saving for Education, Entrepreneurship, and Downpayment (SEED) Policy and Practice Initiative is a long-term savings and investment account policy and practice endeavor that ... All the money will be invested in children’s savings accounts for future purposes ...
Savings.com
... Savings.com, Inc ... The Savings.com domain was purchased in 2003 by a founder of the affiliate marketing company Commission Junction, Inc ... functioning as a lead generation resource under a different management team in 2004, Savings.com brought in a new team and made the move to exclusively offer online and offline coupons in ...
List Of Banks In Sri Lanka - Savings Banks
... National Savings Bank MBSL Savings Bank Sri Lanka Savings Bank. ...

Famous quotes containing the words building and/or bank:

    A publisher is a specialised form of bank or building society, catering for customers who cannot cope with life and are therefore forced to write about it.
    Colin Haycraft (b. 1929)

    A man’s labour is not only his capital but his life. When it passes it returns never more. To utilise it, to prevent its wasteful squandering, to enable the poor man to bank it up for use hereafter, this surely is one of the most urgent tasks before civilisation.
    William Booth (1829–1912)