Auckland - Famous Sights

Famous Sights

Tourist attractions and landmarks in the Auckland metropolitan area include:

Attractions and buildings
  • Auckland Civic Theatre - a famous heritage atmospheric theatre in downtown Auckland. It was renovated in 2000 to its original condition.
  • Harbour Bridge - connecting Central Auckland and the North Shore, an iconic symbol of Auckland.
  • Auckland Town Hall - with its concert hall considered to have some of the finest acoustics in the world, this 1911 building serves both council and entertainment functions.
  • Auckland War Memorial Museum - a large multi-exhibition museum in the Auckland Domain, known for its impressive neo-classicist style.
  • Aotea Square - the hub of downtown Auckland beside Queen Street, it is the site of crafts markets, rallies and arts festivals.
  • St Patrick's Cathedral - the Catholic Cathedral of Auckland. It was renovated from 2003 to 2007 for refurbishment and structural support.
  • Britomart Transport Centre - the main downtown public transport centre in a historic Edwardian building.
  • Eden Park - the city's primary stadium and a frequent home for All Blacks rugby union and Black Caps cricket matches. It was the location of the 2011 Rugby World Cup final.
  • Karangahape Road - known as "K' Road", a street in upper central Auckland famous for its bars, clubs, smaller shops and red-light district.
  • Kelly Tarlton's Sea Life Aquarium - a well-known aquarium and Antarctic environment in the eastern suburb of Mission Bay, built in a set of former sewage storage tanks, showcasing penguins, turtles, sharks, tropical fish, sting rays and other marine creatures.
  • MOTAT - Auckland's Museum for Transport and Technology, at Western Springs.
  • Mt Smart Stadium - a stadium used mainly for rugby league and soccer matches. Also the site of many concerts.
  • New Zealand National Maritime Museum - features exhibitions and collections relating to New Zealand maritime history at Hobson Wharf, adjacent to the Viaduct Basin.
  • Ponsonby - a suburb and main street immediately west of central Auckland known for arts, cafes, culture and historic villas.
  • Queen Street - the main street of the city, from Karangahape Road down to the harbour.
  • Sky Tower - the tallest free-standing structure in the Southern Hemisphere, it is 328 m (1,076 ft) tall and has excellent panoramic views.
  • Vector Arena - events centre in downtown Auckland completed in 2007. Holding 12,000 people, it is used for sports and concert events.
  • Viaduct Basin - a marina and residential development in downtown Auckland, the venue for the America's Cup regattas in 2000 and 2003.
  • Western Springs Stadium - a natural amphitheatre used mainly for speedway races, rock and pop concerts.
Landmarks
  • Auckland Domain - one of the largest parks of the city, close to the CBD and having a good view of the harbour and of Rangitoto Island.
  • Mount Eden - a volcanic cone with a grassy crater. As the highest natural point in Auckland City, it offers 360-degree views of Auckland and is thus a favorite tourist outlook.
  • Mount Victoria - a volcanic cone on the North Shore offering a spectacular view of downtown Auckland. A brisk walk from the Devonport ferry terminal, the cone is steeped in history, as is nearby North Head.
  • One Tree Hill (Maungakiekie) - a volcanic cone that dominates the skyline in the southern, inner suburbs. It no longer has a tree on the summit (after a politically motivated attack on the old tree) but is still crowned by an obelisk.
  • Rangitoto Island - guards the entrance to Waitemata Harbour, and forms a prominent feature on the eastern horizon.
  • Waiheke Island - the second largest island in the Hauraki Gulf and is well known for its beaches, forests, vineyards and olive groves.

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Famous quotes containing the words sights and/or famous:

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