Attack Helicopter

An attack helicopter is a military helicopter with the primary role of an attack aircraft, with the capability of engaging targets on the ground, such as enemy infantry and armored vehicles. Due to their heavy armament they are sometimes called helicopter gunships.

Weapons used on attack helicopters can include autocannons, machine-guns, rockets, and guided missiles such as the Hellfire. Many attack helicopters are also capable of carrying air to air missiles, though mostly for purposes of self-defense. Today's attack helicopter has two main roles: first, to provide direct and accurate close air support for ground troops, and the second, in the anti-tank role to destroy enemy armor concentrations. Attack helicopters are also used to supplement lighter helicopters in the armed scout role. In combat, an attack helicopter is projected to destroy around 17 times its own production cost before it is destroyed.

Read more about Attack HelicopterDevelopment, In Action, Types

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Attack Helicopter - Comparison - Performance
... Helicopter Max ... Speed Cruise Speed Range Ceiling Rate of Climb Agusta A129 Mangusta 280 km/h (170 mph) 230 km/h (140 mph) 510 km (320 mi 280 nmi) 4,700 m (15,000 ft) 10.2 m/s (33 ft/s) / TAI/AW T-129 315 km/h (200 mph) 270 km/h (170 mph) 561 km (350 mi 300 nmi) 6,096 m (20,000 ft) 14 m/s (46 ft/s) Bell AH-1G Cobra 230 km/h (140 mph) 570 km (350 mi 310 nmi) 3,500 m (11,000 ft) 6.3 m/s (21 ft/s) Bell AH-1Z Viper 410 km/h (250 mph) 300 km/h (190 mph) 690 km (430 mi 370 nmi) 6,100 m (20,000 ft) 14.2 m/s (47 ft/s) Boeing AH-64 Apache 290 km/h (180 mph) 270 km/h (170 mph) 480 km (300 mi 260 nmi) 6,400 m (21,000 ft) 12.7 m/s (42 ft/s) Denel AH-2 Rooivalk 310 km/h (190 mph) 280 km/h (170 mph) 740 km (460 mi 400 nmi) 6,100 m (20,000 ft) 13.3 m/s (44 ft/s) Eurocopter Tiger 290 km/h (180 mph) 260 km/h (160 mph) 800 km (500 mi 430 nmi) 4,000 m (13,000 ft) 10.7 m/s (35 ft/s) HAL-LCH 275 km/h (170 mph) 260 km/h (160 mph) 700 km (430 mi 380 nmi) 6,500 m (21,000 ft) 12.0 m/s (39 ft/s) / Kamov Ka-50/-52 315 km/h (200 mph) 270 km/h (170 mph) 550 km (340 mi 300 nmi) 5,500 m (18,000 ft) 10.0 m/s (33 ft/s) Mil Mi-24 335 km/h (210 mph) 450 km (280 mi 240 nmi) 4,500 m (15,000 ft) Mil Mi-28 320 km/h (200 mph) 270 km/h (170 mph) 440 km (270 mi 240 nmi) 5,700 m (19,000 ft) 13.6 m/s (45 ft/s) ...
Advanced Attack Helicopter - History
... of the AH-56 Cheyenne the US Army sought an aircraft to fill an anti-armor attack role ... On 17 August 1972, the Army initiated the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) program ... AAH sought an attack helicopter based on combat experience in Vietnam, with a lower top speed of 145 knots (269 km/h) and twin engines for improved survivability ...
Modern Equipment And Uniform Of The Turkish Army - Aircraft - Rotary Transport/Attack
... Notes Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk Utility helicopter 90 S-70A17/19 56, S-70A28 20 and S-70D28 30 helicopters ... TAI/Sikorsky T-70 Utility helicopter/Attack (Convertible at short notice) 0 Built under license by TAI ... Eurocopter AS-532UL Cougar Utility helicopter 48 Built under license by TAI Agusta-Bell AB206B3 JetRanger Utility and training helicopter 25 Bell 206 JetRanger produced under license by Agusta ...
Advanced Attack Helicopter
... The Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) was a United States Army program to develop an advanced ground attack helicopter beginning in 1972 ... The Advanced Attack Helicopter program followed cancellation of the Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne ...
Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne - Operational History - Program Demise
... Momyer, who cited helicopter casualty statistics of Operation Lam Son 719 ... General Marks in January 1972, to reevaluate the requirements for an attack helicopter ... Analysis of the three helicopters determined that the Bell and Sikorsky helicopters could not fulfill the Army's requirements ...

Famous quotes containing the word attack:

    We attack not only to hurt someone, to defeat him, but perhaps also simply to become conscious of our own strength.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)