Asymmetric Key System

Some articles on key, keys, systems, asymmetric, key system:

Vector Sigma - Transformers Animated
... In Transformers Animated, the key that the AllSpark created for Sari Sumdac from her building access key resembles the key to Vector Sigma from Both Beast Machines and Generation 1 ...
Key Derivation Function - Uses of KDFs
... Key derivation functions are often used in conjunction with non-secret parameters to derive one or more keys from a common secret value (which is sometimes also referred to as "key diversification") ... Such use may prevent an attacker who obtains a derived key from learning useful information about either the input secret value or any of the other derived keys ... A KDF may also be used to ensure that derived keys have other desirable properties, such as avoiding "weak keys" in some specific encryption systems ...
Key Derivation Function
... In cryptography, a key derivation function (or KDF) derives one or more secret keys from a secret value such as a master key or other known information such as a password or passphrase using a pseudo-random ... hash functions are popular examples of pseudo-random functions used for key derivation ...
Public-key Cryptography - Practical Considerations - A Postal Analogy
... be used to understand the advantages of an asymmetric system is to imagine two people, Alice and Bob, who are sending a secret message through the public mail ... With a symmetric key system, Alice first puts the secret message in a box, and locks the box using a padlock to which she has a key ... When Bob receives the box, he uses an identical copy of Alice's key (which he has somehow obtained previously, maybe by a face-to-face meeting) to open the box, and reads the message ...
Key - Other
... kinds of bottle and can openers Clef (from the French for "key"), the symbol that assigns note names to the lines and spaces of the musical staff Greek key pattern, a meander pattern Key (bask ...

Famous quotes containing the words system and/or key:

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