Astronomy - Observational Astronomy - Astrometry and Celestial Mechanics

Astrometry and Celestial Mechanics

One of the oldest fields in astronomy, and in all of science, is the measurement of the positions of celestial objects. Historically, accurate knowledge of the positions of the Sun, Moon, planets and stars has been essential in celestial navigation and in the making of calendars.

Careful measurement of the positions of the planets has led to a solid understanding of gravitational perturbations, and an ability to determine past and future positions of the planets with great accuracy, a field known as celestial mechanics. More recently the tracking of near-Earth objects will allow for predictions of close encounters, and potential collisions, with the Earth.

The measurement of stellar parallax of nearby stars provides a fundamental baseline in the cosmic distance ladder that is used to measure the scale of the universe. Parallax measurements of nearby stars provide an absolute baseline for the properties of more distant stars, because their properties can be compared. Measurements of radial velocity and proper motion show the kinematics of these systems through the Milky Way galaxy. Astrometric results are also used to measure the distribution of dark matter in the galaxy.

During the 1990s, the astrometric technique of measuring the stellar wobble was used to detect large extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars.

Read more about this topic:  Astronomy, Observational Astronomy

Famous quotes containing the words mechanics and/or celestial:

    It is only the impossible that is possible for God. He has given over the possible to the mechanics of matter and the autonomy of his creatures.
    Simone Weil (1909–1943)

    He all their ammunition
    And feats of war defeats
    With plain heroic magnitude of mind
    And celestial vigour armed;
    John Milton (1608–1674)