Aspotogan Peninsula - History: Eighteenth Century

History: Eighteenth Century

The name Aspotogan is a corruption of Ashmutogun or Ukpudeskakun meaning “block the passage way or where the seals go in and out”. Along with the Mi'kmaq, there were primarily three strains of immigrants who settled the Aspotogan Peninsula: first the Newfoundland Irish (1750s), then the New England Planters arrived from Chester, Nova Scotia (1760s) and, finally, second generation Foreign Protestants arrived from French Village, Nova Scotia and Lunenburg, Nova Scotia (1780s). The community of Blandford, Nova Scotia was the first community on the Aspotogan to be settled. The first recorded school house was built in Mill Cove, Nova Scotia (before 1833).

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Aspotogan Peninsula - History: Eighteenth Century - Foreign Protestants
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