Article One of The United States Constitution

Article One Of The United States Constitution

Article One of the United States Constitution describes the powers of Congress, the legislative branch of the federal government. The Article establishes the powers of and limitations on the Congress, consisting of a House of Representatives composed of Representatives, with each state gaining or losing representation in proportion to its population, and a Senate, composed of two Senators from each state. The article details the manner of election and qualifications of members of each House. It outlines legislative procedure and enumerates the powers vested in the legislative branch. Finally, it establishes limits on the powers of both Congress and the states.

Read more about Article One Of The United States Constitution:  Overview, Section 1: Legislative Power Vested in Congress, Section 9: Limits On Congress

Other articles related to "article one of the united states constitution, state, states":

Article One Of The United States Constitution - Section 10: Limits On The States - Clause 3: Compact Clause
... No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or ... Under the Compact Clause, states may not, without the consent of Congress, keep troops or armies during times of peace ... They may not enter into alliances nor compacts with foreign states, nor engage in war unless invaded ...

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