Arkansas Railroad Museum

Arkansas Railroad Museum is located on Port Road in Pine Bluff, Arkansas at the former Cotton Belt (SSW) yard.

The former SSW shops are occupied by the historic collection of railroad equipment. This museum is about an hour's drive from Little Rock, AR, and is one of the largest displays of historic railroad equipment in Arkansas. Between the disappearance of SSW in 1992 into parent Southern Pacific and the size of the collection, Arkansas Railroad Museum can be considered an upper-level railroad preservation facility. The Museum is operated by the Cotton Belt Rail Historical Society and local volunteers. The Museum is open Monday through Saturday from 9 AM to 3 PM and on Sunday afternoon by appointment.

Read more about Arkansas Railroad MuseumSpecific Equipment, Facility

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Arkansas Railroad Museum - Facility
... overhead cranes, and tools for servicing large railroad equipment ... (unless that weekend is Easter) when the Museum has its annual show ... Many of the exhibits are taken outside so that tables can be set up inside the museum for vendors ...

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