Ares (DC Comics) - Publication History

Publication History

Ares first appeared in Wonder Woman #1, volume 1, published in the summer of 1942, written by Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston. In the very next issue, he reappeared under his Roman name, Mars. He would retain this name until February 1987, when comics writer/artist George PĂ©rez restored the Greek name Ares as part of his reboot of the Wonder Woman mythos. As the narrative continuity of the Wonder Woman comic has been adjusted by different writers throughout the years, various versions of Mars/Ares, with various personalities and physical appearances, have been presented. He has appeared in one of two guises - either as a muscular blond man in contemporary clothing, with red eyes and a scarred torso; or as a demonic Greek warrior clad in black and blue battle armor, face hidden by a hoplite helmet.

The New 52 version of the character is that of an old man with a long white beard. His feet are also seen to be permanently smeared with blood.

Read more about this topic:  Ares (DC Comics)

Other articles related to "publication history, history":

War Of The Lance - Publication History
... the Tales II Trilogy, The War of the Lance, is built around the history of Krynn during the War of the Lance ... Adventures sourcebook details the major events of Krynn's past, and the history of the War of the Lance is given in great detail on all the battles and political machinations of the world-s ...
Hallowe'en Party - Film, TV or Theatrical Adaptations - Publication History
... In the US, the novel appeared in the December 1969 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine. ...

Famous quotes containing the words history and/or publication:

    Let it suffice that in the light of these two facts, namely, that the mind is One, and that nature is its correlative, history is to be read and written.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    I would rather have as my patron a host of anonymous citizens digging into their own pockets for the price of a book or a magazine than a small body of enlightened and responsible men administering public funds. I would rather chance my personal vision of truth striking home here and there in the chaos of publication that exists than attempt to filter it through a few sets of official, honorably public-spirited scruples.
    John Updike (b. 1932)