Ardmore Air Force Base

Ardmore Air Force Base is an inactive United States Air Force base, approximately 11 miles northeast of Ardmore, Oklahoma. It was active during World War II as a heavy bomber training airfield and during the early years of the Cold War as a troop carrier base. It was closed on 31 March 1959.

Read more about Ardmore Air Force Base:  History, Ardmore Today

Other articles related to "ardmore air force base, ardmore, air, air force base, force":

Ardmore Air Force Base - Ardmore Today
... The official closing of Ardmore Air Force Base occurred on 31 March 1959 returning the facility to the City of Ardmore for the second time in 1959 ... with a stipulation that it would be used as Ardmore's Municipal Airport and be maintained in perpetuity for airport purposes ... The Ardmore Industrial Airpark, owned by the City of Ardmore, is presently leased to the Ardmore Development Authority ...
800 Naval Air Squadron
800 Naval Air Squadron was a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm carrier based squadron formed on 3 April 1933 by amalgamating No's 402 and 404 (Fleet Fighter) Flights ...
97th Air Mobility Wing
... The 97th Air Mobility Wing (97 AMW) is a United States Air Force unit assigned to the Air Education and Training Command Nineteenth Air Force ... It is stationed at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma ... Wing was a component organization of Strategic Air Command's deterrent force during the Cold War, as a strategic bombardment wing ...
8 Flight Army Air Corps
8 Flight Army Air Corps is one of the Independent Flights within the British Army's Army Air Corps. 8 Flight is attached to the Special Air Service and based alongside them in Hereford ...

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