Architecture in Glasgow

Architecture In Glasgow

The city of Glasgow, Scotland, has a distinct architecture, and is particularly noted for its 19th-century Victorian architecture, and the early-20th-century "Glasgow Style", as developed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Very little of medieval Glasgow remains, the two main landmarks from this period being the 15th-century Provand's Lordship and 13th-century St. Mungo's Cathedral. The vast majority of the city as seen today dates from the 19th century. As a result, Glasgow has an impressive heritage of Victorian architecture: the Glasgow City Chambers; the main building of the University of Glasgow, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott; and the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, designed by Sir John W. Simpson are outstanding examples.

Read more about Architecture In Glasgow:  Glasgow Style, Victorian Era, Modern Era

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Architecture In Glasgow - Modern Era
... Modern buildings in Glasgow include the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, and along the banks of the Clyde are the Glasgow Science Centre and the Scottish Exhibition and Conference ... Glasgow's impressive historical and modern architectural traditions were celebrated in 1999 when the city was designated UK City of Architecture and Design, winning the accolade over Liverpool and Edinburgh ...

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