Apple - Apple Cultivars

Apple Cultivars

There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples. Cultivars vary in their yield and the ultimate size of the tree, even when grown on the same rootstock. Different cultivars are available for temperate and subtropical climates. One large collection of over 2,100 apple cultivars is housed at the National Fruit Collection in England. Most of these cultivars are bred for eating fresh (dessert apples), though some are cultivated specifically for cooking (cooking apples) or producing cider. Cider apples are typically too tart and astringent to eat fresh, but they give the beverage a rich flavour that dessert apples cannot.

Commercially popular apple cultivars are soft but crisp. Other desired qualities in modern commercial apple breeding are a colourful skin, absence of russeting, ease of shipping, lengthy storage ability, high yields, disease resistance, typical 'Red Delicious' apple shape, and popular flavour. Modern apples are generally sweeter than older cultivars, as popular tastes in apples have varied over time. Most North Americans and Europeans favour sweet, subacid apples, but tart apples have a strong minority following. Extremely sweet apples with barely any acid flavour are popular in Asia and especially India.

Old cultivars are often oddly shaped, russeted, and have a variety of textures and colours. Some find them to have a better flavour than modern cultivars, but may have other problems which make them commercially unviable, such as low yield, disease susceptibility, or poor tolerance for storage or transport. A few old cultivars are still produced on a large scale, but many have been kept alive by home gardeners and farmers that sell directly to local markets. Many unusual and locally important cultivars with their own unique taste and appearance exist; apple conservation campaigns have sprung up around the world to preserve such local cultivars from extinction. In the United Kingdom, old cultivars such as 'Cox's Orange Pippin' and 'Egremont Russet' are still commercially important even though by modern standards they are low yielding and disease prone.

Read more about this topic:  Apple

Other articles related to "apples, apple cultivars":

Cider Apple
... Cider apples are a group of apple cultivars grown for their use in cider production ... the Long Ashton Research Station categorised cider apples in 1903 into four main types according to the nature of their flavour components ... Cider apples therefore often have higher sugar levels than Dessert and Culinary apples ...
Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus - Environment
... west and pose the most notable threat to the popular apple cultivars of the region such as "Granny Smith" and "Ginger Golds." Apple cultivars will show great signs ... Despite the cosmetic damage suffered by these light skinned apple cultivars they are seemingly unaffected by most thrip vectored viruses ... Infested apples of the mountain west simply provide a natural setting for Western Flower Thrips to thrive and reproduce ...

Famous quotes containing the word apple:

    No people require maxims so much as the American. The reason is obvious: the country is so vast, the people always going somewhere, from Oregon apple valley to boreal New England, that we do not know whether to be temperate orchards or sterile climate.
    Edward Dahlberg (1900–1977)