Appian - Works

Works

Appian began writing his history around the middle of the second century AD. Only sections from half of the original 24 books survive today. The most important remnants of Appian's work are the five books on the Civil Warsbooks 13-17 of the Roman History. These five books stand out because they are the only comprehensive, meticulous source available on an extremely significant historical period, during which Roman politics were in turmoil because of factional strife.

Especially notable is this work's ethnographic structure. Appian most likely used this structure to facilitate his readers' orientation through the sequence of events, which occur in different places and are united only by their relationship to Rome. A literary example of this can be found from Appian’s Civil Wars (part 5 of 17). It states, “And now civil discord broke out again worse than ever and increased enormously....so in the course of events in the Roman empire was partitioned....by these three men: Antony, Lepidus, and the one who was first called Octavius....shortly after this division they fell to quarrelling among themselves...Octavius...first deprived Lepidus of Africa...and afterward, as the result of the battle of Actium, took from Antony all the provinces lying between Syria and the Adriatic gulf."

One might expect that a historical work covering nine centuries and countless different peoples would involve a multitude of testimonials from different periods. However, Appian's sources remain uncertain, as he only mentions the source of his information under special circumstances. He may have relied primarily on one author for each book, whom he did not follow uncritically, since Appian also used additional sources for precision and correction. At our present state of knowledge questions regarding Appian’s sources cannot be solved.

Read more about this topic:  Appian

Other articles related to "works, work":

Figured Bass - Basso Continuo
... The titles of many Baroque works make mention of the continuo section, such as J ... at least in modern performances, is harpsichord and cello for instrumental works and secular vocal works, such as operas, and organ for sacred music ... In addition, the mere composition of certain works seems to require certain kind of instruments (for instance, Vivaldi's Stabat Mater seems to require an organ, and not a ...
Zacharias Werner - Works
... Wanda, 1810 Die Weihe der Unkraft, 1813, a recantation of his earlier work Martin Luther Kunigunde die Heilige, 1815 Geistliche Übungen für drei Tage, 1818 Die Mutter der Makkabäer, 1820 Zacharias Werner's Theater ...
Ignacy Krasicki - Fame
... Krasicki's major works won European fame and were translated into Latin, French, German, Italian, Russian, Czech, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian ... The broad reception of his works was sustained throughout the 19th century ... Krasicki has been the subject of works by poets of the Polish Enlightenment – Stanisław Trembecki, Franciszek Zabłocki, Wojciech Mier – and in the 20th century, by Konstanty ...
Works Progress Administration
... The Works Progress Administration (renamed during 1939 as the Works Project Administration WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unskilled workers to carry out ... and state histories, artists painted murals and other works for new federal post offices and other buildings ...
Norman Rockwell - Body of Work
... artist, producing over 4,000 original works in his lifetime ... Most of his works are either in public collections, or have been destroyed in fire or other misfortunes ... Boy Scouts of America), were only slightly overshadowed by his most popular of calendar works the "Four Seasons" illustrations for Brown Bigelow that were published for 17 years ...

Famous quotes containing the word works:

    Only the more uncompromising of the mystics still seek for knowledge in a silent land of absolute intuition, where the intellect finally lays down its conceptual tools, and rests from its pragmatic labors, while its works do not follow it, but are simply forgotten, and are as if they never had been.
    Josiah Royce (1855–1916)

    Do not worry about the incarnation of ideas. If you are a poet, your works will contain them without your knowledge—they will be both moral and national if you follow your inspiration freely.
    Vissarion Belinsky (1810–1848)

    We do not fear censorship for we have no wish to offend with improprieties or obscenities, but we do demand, as a right, the liberty to show the dark side of wrong, that we may illuminate the bright side of virtue—the same liberty that is conceded to the art of the written word, that art to which we owe the Bible and the works of Shakespeare.
    —D.W. (David Wark)