Ancient Greek Painting

Ancient Greek Painting

Ancient art history
series
Middle East
  • Mesopotamia
  • Ancient Egypt
Asia
  • India
  • China
  • Japan
  • Scythia
European prehistory
  • Nuragic
  • Etruscan
  • Celtic
  • Picts
  • Norse
  • Visigothic
Classical art
  • Ancient Greece
  • Hellenistic
  • Rome

The arts of ancient Greece have exercised an enormous influence on the culture of many countries all over the world, particularly in the areas of sculpture and architecture. In the West, the art of the Roman Empire was largely derived from Greek models. In the East, Alexander the Great's conquests initiated several centuries of exchange between Greek, Central Asian and Indian cultures, resulting in Greco-Buddhist art, with ramifications as far as Japan. Following the Renaissance in Europe, the humanist aesthetic and the high technical standards of Greek art inspired generations of European artists. Well into the 19th century, the classical tradition derived from Greece dominated the art of the western world.

In reality, there was a sharp transition from one period to another. Forms of art developed at different speeds in different parts of the Greek world, and as in any age some artists worked in more innovative styles than others. Strong local traditions, conservative in character, and the requirements of local cults, enable historians to locate the origins even of displaced works of art.

Read more about Ancient Greek Painting:  Pottery, Metal Vessels, Monumental Sculpture, Architecture, Coin Design, Painting

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