Analyte

An analyte, or component (in clinical chemistry), is a substance or chemical constituent that is of interest in an analytical procedure. Grammatically, it is important to note that experiments always seek to measure properties of analytes—and that analytes themselves can never be measured. For instance, one cannot measure a table (analyte-component) but, the height, width, etc. of a table can be measured. Likewise, one cannot measure glucose but can measure the glucose concentration. In this example "glucose" is the component and "concentration" is the measurable property. In laboratory and layman jargon the "property" is often left out provided the omission does not lead to an ambiguity of what property is measured.

Other articles related to "analyte":

Gravimetric Analysis
... chemistry for the quantitative determination of an analyte based on the mass of a solid ... In most cases, the analyte must first be converted to a solid by precipitation with an appropriate reagent ... The amount of analyte in the original sample can then be calculated from the mass of the precipitate and its chemical composition ...
Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy - Theory - Vibrations
... are caused by some sort of excitation to make the analyte resonate beyond its normal modes ... ARS employs forced vibrations upon the analyte unlike most commonly used techniques which use free vibrations to measure the analyte ... normal modes by sweeping the excitation frequency of an analyte with no internal vibrations to obtain a resonance spectrum ...
Sample Preparation In Mass Spectrometry - Electrospray Ionization
... off-line measurements (in contrast to on-line measurements using LC-MS), the analyte solution is applied by a spray capillary to the mass spectrometer ... in protein analysis a relatively high concentration of the analyte ... process accounts for the demand of a salt-free analyte solution ...
STPF - Principles
... The technique makes use of absorption spectrometry to assess the concentration of an analyte in a sample ... It requires standards with known analyte content to establish the relation between the measured absorbance and the analyte concentration and relies therefore on the Beer-Lambert Law ... two values (the absorbance) is converted to analyte concentration or mass using the Beer-Lambert Law ...