Analog Devices

Analog Devices

Analog Devices, Inc., known as ADI, is an American multinational semiconductor company specializing in data conversion and signal conditioning technology, headquartered in Norwood, Massachusetts. In 2012, Analog Devices led the worldwide data converter market with a 48.5% share, according to analyst firm Databeans.

The company is a leading manufacturer of analog, mixed-signal and digital signal processing (DSP) integrated circuits (ICs) used in electronic equipment. These technologies are used to convert, condition and process real-world phenomena, such as light, sound, temperature, motion, and pressure into electrical signals.

Analog Devices has approximately 60,000 customers worldwide. The company serves customers in the following industries: communications, computer, industrial, instrumentation, military/aerospace, automotive, and high-performance consumer electronics applications.

Read more about Analog DevicesHistory, Locations, Notable Employees, Core Products and Technologies, Market Segments, Competitors, Analog Dialogue, Acquisitions, Board of Directors, Further Reading and Resources

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