Amuse-bouche - Usage in Restaurants

Usage in Restaurants

The amuse-bouche as an identifiable course arose during the Nouvelle Cuisine movement, which emphasized smaller, more intensely flavored courses. It differs from other hors d'œuvres in that it is small, usually just one or two bites, and preselected by the chef and offered free of charge to all present at the table.

The functional role of the amuse-bouche could be played by rather simple offerings, such as a plate of olives or a crock of tapenade. It often becomes a showcase, however, due to the artistry and showmanship of the chef, intensified by the competition among restaurants. According to Jean-Georges Vongerichten, a popular New York celebrity chef with restaurants around the world, "The amuse-bouche is the best way for a great chef to express his big ideas in small bites".

At some point, the amuse-bouche transformed from an unexpected bonus to a de rigueur offering at Michelin Guide-starred restaurants and those aspiring to that category (as recently as 1999, The New York Times provided a parenthetical explanation of the course). This in turn created a set of logistical challenges for restaurants: amuse-bouche must be prepared in sufficient quantities to be served to all guests, usually just after the order is taken or between main courses. This often requires a separate cooking station devoted solely to producing the course quickly as well as a large and varied collection of specialized china for serving the amuse. Interesting plates, demitasse cups, and large Asian-style soup spoons are popular choices. In addition, the kitchen must accommodate guests that have an aversion or allergy to ingredients in the amuse.

  • A Parmesan pannacotta amuse-bouche

  • a Japanese-influenced amuse-bouche: Hamachi, salmon roe, basil, basil flower

Read more about this topic:  Amuse-bouche

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