American Dietetic Association

American Dietetic Association

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the United States' largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, with close to 72,000 members. After nearly 100 years as the American Dietetic Association (ADA), the organization officially changed its name to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (A.N.D.) in 2012. The organization’s members are primarily registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians as well as many researchers, educators, students, nurses, physicians, pharmacists, clinical and community dietetics professionals, consultants and food service managers.

Read more about American Dietetic Association:  Origins, Finances and Organization, Influence and Positions, Certification, Lobbying Efforts and Competitive Protections, Kids Eat Right, Controversy, Additional Publications

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